What is Pupil Premium?

Pupil premium was introduced in April, 2011 to close the gap between FSM (Free School Meals) and Non-FSM pupils. It is allocated to schools to work with pupils who have been registered for free school meals at any point in the last six years (known as ‘Ever 6 FSM’). Schools also receive funding for children who have been looked after continuously for more than six months and children of service personnel and we have the autonomy of how to use the pupil premium funding to ensure the best impact.

To view our 2017-18 Pupil Premium strategies and how we spend the budget, please see the document below.

Magnus Pupil Premium Strategies 2017-2018

Below contains information regarding years 2015-16 and 2016-17.

Pupil Premium Funding per pupil

2015-16£935 per Y7 – Y 11 Student, £1,900 per Looked After Student
2016-17£935 per Y7 – Y11 Student, £1,900 per Looked After Student

Magnus Church of England Academy use of Pupil Premium Strategy to raise attainment

Our intent at Magnus is to enrich the lives of all our students, no matter their background or prior attainment. To that end, we aim to both raise achievement of all our learners, as well as ensuring that we close the gap between our student groups. At Magnus, we have a much higher than national average number of students with Pupil Premium funding. It is therefore right to ensure most of their needs are increasingly met through high quality universal provision. Our model to achieve success with these students is therefore as follows:

  1. Improving provision for all students by our strategic improvement planning that has measurable impact in classrooms and elsewhere in the life of the academy.
  2. By having a timely and targeted intervention model based around responsive data driven decision making.

In 2015-16, 310 students in years 7-11 are eligible for Pupil Premium under the Free School Meals (FSM6) ever calculation, equating to 44.3% of the academy cohort.

Year GroupTotal no of studentsNo of Pupil Premium students% of Year Group
71206050%
81255544%
91366548%
101566743%
111626339%

2015-16 Pupil premium funding received

Total Funding Allocated£293,215

Pupil Premium Strategy 2015-16

Retaining good leadership – Maths & English£30,648
Academic Support (English & Maths tutors & Graduate Interns)£64,541
Booster Club/Holiday Schools/Revision Sessions£10,000
SLT Post for Closing the Gap£69,216
Academic Mentoring – Staff Costs£8,000
Hub staffing costs£31,254
Attendance & Education Welfare Post£31,135
60% of Careers Education£4,292
Accelerated Reader License£2,791
50% of Library staffing costs for AR & switch on£24,714
Additional Switch on – Support staff£3,272
Breakfast Club (FSM students receive free breakfast)£5,873
Bespoke iChoose reward system£7,479
TOTAL£293,215

2016-17 Pupil Premium Strategy forecast

Retaining good leadership – Maths & English£31,000
Academic Support (English & Maths tutors + Graduate Interns)£65,000
Booster club/Holiday Schools/Revision Sessions£10,000
SLT Post for closing the gap£70,000
Academic Mentoring – Staff costs£8,000
Hub staffing costs£23,000
Attendance & Education Welfare Post£32,000
60% of Careers Education£5,000
Accelerated Reader License£3,000
50% of Library staffing costs for AR & Switch on£25,000
Additional switch on – support staff£3,000
Breakfast club (FSM students receive free breakfast)£6,000
Bespoke iChoose reward system£7,000
TOTAL EXPENDITURE FORECAST£288,000

Our aims are:

Provide additional targeted support for PP students where needed through:

  1. To maintain a clear strategic lead for closing the gap.
  2. To raise attainment and progress of all PP students in English and maths.
    1. Strong leadership in these key subject areas
    2. the provision of revision classes and exam materials.
    3. access to a hardship fund.
  3. To increase reading and spelling ages for PP students, with a particular focus on boys.
  4. Improve attendance and narrow the attendance gap for PP and significant groups.
  5. To increase student aspiration and motivation through:
    • timely Careers Education Information Advice and Guidance.
    • a strong rewards system
    • involvement in music tuition and performance
  6. To support the whole child through a range of provision including, health, behaviour, confidence and esteem, through “the Hub”.

The next Pupil Premium Strategy Review date is September 2017.

Year 7 Catch up Premium

In total, 28 students joined Magnus below level 4 in math’s, English or both in September 2015.

21 of these students were Pupil Premium, 11 were SEN and 3 were EAL.

By the end of the academic year, this number had reduced to 16.

Funding 2015-16

The funding allocated to the academy for Catch-Up students 2015-16 was £15500. This money was allocated to the following areas:

  • Switch-on: an intensive reading recovery programme
  • Booster Club staffing: an after-school and holiday provision, providing support with reading, homework and positive engagement
  • Maths achievement tutor: provision of small group and individual intervention as appropriate
  • Nurture group provision: a small group teaching approach for selected students with SEN

Maths

  • 21 students joined Magnus in Y7 2015 below level 4 in math’s
  • On average, these students made 2.8 sub-levels of progress in math’s over the year
  • 11 achieved level 4 or above by the end of the year

English

  • 18 students joined Magnus in Y7 2015 below level 4 in English
  • On average, these students made 2.1 sub-levels of progress in English over the year
  • 8 achieved level 4 or above by the end of the year 

Intervention Impact

  • 11 Catch-Up students attended summer school before joining Magnus. These students made on average 1.3 sub-levels of progress in English, and 2.2 sub-levels of progress in maths. 6 achieved level 4 or above in math’s, and 7 achieved level 4 or above in English.
  • 13 students attended Booster Club sessions during the year, staying after school for support with homework or reading. These students made on average 1 sub-levels of progress in English, and 2.2 sub-levels of progress in maths. 6 achieved level 4 or above in math’s, and 7 achieved level 4 or above in English.
  • 9 students participated in “Switch-on”, and intensive reading recovery programme. These students made on average ?? sub-levels of progress in English, and ?? sub-levels of progress in math’s. 2 achieved level 4 or above in maths, and 2 achieved level 4 or above in English.
  • 24 students were targeted for 2 extra hours of literacy per weeks instead of Modern Foreign Languages. These students made on average 1.7 sub-levels of progress in English, and 1.5 sub-levels of progress in maths. 12 achieved level 4 or above in maths, and 13 achieved level 4 or above in English.
  • 4 students were targeted for extra support by the Academy’s math’s mentor. The majority were taught in a small group for math’s, with some receiving extra support in lessons. These students made on average 2.7 sub-levels of progress in math’s. 3 students achieved level 4 or above in maths